Hilfe Warenkorb Konto Anmelden
 
 
   Schnellsuche   
     zur Expertensuche                      
Comparative Vocational Education Research - Enduring Challenges and New Ways Forward  
Comparative Vocational Education Research - Enduring Challenges and New Ways Forward
von: Matthias Pilz, Junmin Li
Springer VS, 2020
ISBN: 9783658299248
327 Seiten, Download: 3565 KB
 
Format:  PDF
geeignet für: Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Online-Lesen PC, MAC, Laptop

Typ: B (paralleler Zugriff)

 

 
eBook anfordern
Inhaltsverzeichnis

  Dedicated to Madhu Singh 6  
  Series Editor’s introduction 7  
  Preface 8  
     1 The significance of the title 8  
     2 Structure of the book 9  
     3 Acknowledgements 10  
     References 10  
  Contents 11  
  I Introduction/Opening Chapter 14  
     1Comparative vocational education and training research: What purposes does it serve? 15  
        Abstract 15  
        1 Introduction 16  
        2 Exploring intersecting domains 18  
        3 Can we find common cause in the advancement of VET? 21  
        4 Towards a more dialogic approach 24  
        5 A triadic conception of purposes in comparative VET research 26  
        References 29  
  Part II International Comparative VET Theories and Methodologies 32  
     2Beyond typologies: Alternative ways of comparing VET systems 33  
        Abstract 33  
        1 Introduction: About the difficulties of comparative VET research 34  
        2 Comparison by function 36  
           2.1 Selection and allocation function 37  
           2.2 Qualification function 38  
           2.3 Utilisation function 38  
           2.4 Retention and integration function 39  
           2.5 Organisation 40  
           2.6 Innovation 41  
        3 Comparison by quality 42  
           3.1 Dimensions of quality along the training process 43  
           3.2 Different perspectives on VET quality 44  
        4 Discussion 46  
        References 48  
     3A framework for the comparative study of institutional-employer partnerships in vocational education and training 52  
        Abstract 52  
        1 Introduction 52  
        2 Comparative analysis of partnerships between institutions and employers 53  
        3 The four models of VET partnership and programme development 56  
        4 Concluding remarks 62  
        References 63  
     4Tools and means to understand different TVET models in developing countries: An approach to the epistemological opening up of international TVET in development cooperation 66  
        Abstract 66  
        1 Introduction 66  
        2 Internationally comparative vocational education research: The typologies 69  
        3 The ideal types of the classical European vocational education models 69  
        4 A comparative political economy typology: Skill formation systems 73  
        5 Bridging the two perspectives of the typologies 75  
        6 Work culture as an analytical instrument to shed light on the societal aspects of TVET 76  
        7 Outlook 83  
        References 83  
  Part III Research Results on International Comparative VET 88  
     5The learning outcome approach to European VET policy tools: Where are the arguments and the evidence? 89  
        Abstract 89  
        1 What one might hope for from policymaking 90  
        2 EU VET policymaking and the learning outcome approach 91  
        3 The EU’s aspirations 93  
        4 The European VET Policy tools 94  
        5 What can be salvaged? 100  
        6 Conclusion: What have we learned? 101  
        References 101  
     6The Swiss PET system and similar programs in Germany and Austria 104  
        Abstract 104  
        1 Introduction 104  
        2 Professional education and training in Switzerland 105  
        3 Advanced vocational education and dual studies/integrated degree programs in Germany 108  
        4 The variety of PET programs in Austria 111  
        5 Comparative analysis of the three PET systems 113  
        6 Conclusion 117  
        References 117  
     7Competency-based education and training in Namibia: Educational transfer as imitation 119  
        Abstract 119  
        1 CBET: Principles and myths 120  
           1.1 Behaviourism 120  
           1.2 Functionalism 121  
        2 Namibia 124  
           2.1 Context 124  
           2.2 Establishment of CBET in Namibia 125  
           2.3 Behaviourism and low-level qualifications 127  
           2.4 Functionalism and skill gaps 130  
        3 Imitation transfer and the myth of simplicity 132  
        References 134  
     8Skill formation in cross-border contexts: The case of the trinational Upper Rhine region 137  
        Abstract 137  
        1 Introduction 137  
        2 Theoretical framework: Comparative capitalism, cross-border regions, and skill formation 139  
           2.1 Analytical perspectives on cross-border industry clusters 140  
           2.2 Vocational education and training in a cross-border industry cluster: Theoretical expectation 141  
        3 Methods and data 142  
        4 Vocational education and training in the chemistry, pharmaceutical and life sciences cross-border cluster 144  
           4.1 The Aprentas training network 145  
           4.2 Cross-border perspectives on the Aprentas training nextwork 146  
           4.3 Findings: The leveraging of regional complementarities 148  
        5 Conclusion 149  
        References 150  
     9Comparing the integration of technical vocational education and training (TVET) in systems of innovation: Towards a new cultural political economy of skills? 154  
        Abstract 154  
        1 Introduction 155  
        2 Cultural political economy of skills 156  
        3 Initial findings: Global discourses on innovation 159  
        4 Notes from the cases of Germany and Brazil 161  
        5 Comparing the integration of TVET in systems of innovation 163  
        6 Conclusion 165  
        References 165  
     10Evaluating dual apprenticeship effects on youth employment: A focus on the mechanisms 168  
        Abstract 168  
        1 Introduction 169  
        2 Realist evaluation approach 169  
        3 Methods and data 172  
        4 Situated learning 174  
        5 Skill content 177  
        6 Institutional contact 180  
        7 Discussion 182  
        8 Conclusions 183  
        References 184  
     11Competency-based curriculum development in vocational education and training: An example of knowledge transfer from the Western world to India 186  
        Abstract 186  
        1 Introduction 186  
        2 Competency-based curriculum: Theoretical framework 187  
        3 Objective of the study 189  
        4 Country context – India 189  
        5 Competency-based curriculum: A European approach 190  
        6 Developing competency-based curricula: A small intervention activity 192  
           6.1 Methods and data 192  
           6.2 Experts interviews 193  
        7 Competency-based sewing curriculum development 193  
        8 Conclusion 198  
        References 199  
     12Transfer research as an element of comparative vocational education and training: An example of factors influencing the transfer of dual training approaches of German companies in China, India and Mexico 204  
        Abstract 204  
        1 Introduction 205  
        2 Transfer: A theorectical framing 206  
        3 Methods and procedure 208  
        4 Presentations and discussion of influencing factors 209  
           4.1 Connectivity to the vocational school system 209  
           4.2 Local labour market 210  
           4.3 Institutional framing by the government 211  
           4.4 Social setting 212  
           4.5 Institutional framing through local and regional cooperation 213  
           4.6 Production specifics 214  
           4.7 Economic rationalities 215  
           4.8 Socialisation background of the decision-maker 216  
           4.9 Specific company characteristics 217  
           4.10 Summary of the influencing variables 217  
        5 Conclusions for the transfer of dual training approaches 218  
        References 220  
     13How decent is work in the automobile industry in Shanghai? What does it mean for Chinese vocational education and training? An analysis of shop floor jobs in the Shanghai automobile industry 225  
        Abstract 225  
        1 Introduction 225  
        2 Selection of research object and field 226  
        3 Methodology 228  
        4 Major findings 231  
           4.1 Case analysis: Employment in auto party and subsystem suppliers 231  
              4.1.1 Dignity 231  
              4.1.2 Equality 232  
              4.1.3 Productive work 233  
              4.1.4 Quality job 233  
              4.1.5 Security 234  
           4.2 Case Analysis: Employment in Auto OEM 234  
              4.2.1 Dignity 234  
              4.2.2 Equality 235  
              4.2.3 Productive work 235  
              4.2.4 Quality job 236  
              4.2.5 Security 236  
           4.3 Case Analysis: Employment in Auto services 236  
              4.3.1 Dignity 237  
              4.3.2 Equality 237  
              4.3.3 Productive work 237  
              4.3.4 Quality job 238  
              4.3.5 Security 238  
        5 Summary and conclusion 239  
        6 Implications 241  
        References 242  
  Part IV Lessons Learnt from Comparative VET Research in Practice 244  
     14Comparative methods in practice: Using an iterative approach to explore aviation apprenticeships in England and Germany 245  
        Abstract 245  
        1 Introduction 245  
        2 Object of comparison and selection of countries 248  
        3 Development of the research question 250  
        4 The rhetoric of the tertium comparationis 251  
        5 The reality of applying the tertium comparationis 251  
        6 Conclusion 256  
        References 258  
     15Reflections on typologies of comparison studies and the necessity of cultural-historical views illustrated by the analysis of the Swedish vocational education system from abroad 260  
        Abstract 260  
        1 The need of cultural awareness in comparative research 261  
           1.1 What has led me to the socio-historic approach? 261  
           1.2 The discussion about typology and classification 261  
        2 Folkhemmet and lagom as the cultural basis of the Swedish educational system 264  
        3 The turn to marketisation and current debates in Sweden 266  
           3.1 The shift towards marketisation in the 1990s 266  
           3.2 Bringing the students closer to work – New apprenticeship since 2000 267  
           3.3 Current challenges and concepts in Sweden 269  
        4 Consequences and critical self-reflection 270  
        References 272  
     16The value of ethnography and the comparative case study approach in VET research – exemplified by the project “VET cultures in a European comparison” 276  
        Abstract 276  
        1 Ethnography and comparative VET research 276  
        2 The ethnographic study “VET cultures in a European comparison” 279  
        3 CCS approach as an analytical framework for the ethnographic comparative VET study 283  
           3.1 Two logics of comparison 283  
           3.2 Process-orientation 283  
           3.3 Three axes of comparison 286  
        4 Conclusion 289  
        References 289  
     17Undertaking comparative VET research in international teams: The example of exploring recruitment and training cultures in SMEs in Germany, Australia and the United States 292  
        Abstract 292  
        1 Introduction 293  
        2 The starting point: the common research objective 294  
        3 Planning and coordination of international comparative research 294  
        4 Key findings 298  
           4.1 Germany 298  
           4.2 Australia 300  
           4.3 United States 302  
        5 Some major differences in comparing the countries 305  
        6 Conclusion: Major considerations in undertaking international research in multinational teams 306  
        References 307  
  VClosing Chapter 311  
     18Comparison of VET approaches through history, with a particular focus on Africa 312  
        Abstract 312  
        1 Introduction 312  
        2 The era of industrial education in the United States and Africa 313  
        3 Technical and vocational education and training: A donor priority 314  
        4 The discovery of the informal sector: Implications for training and historical comparison 315  
        5 VET’s natural policy connections – a) Nonformal education & skills development 317  
        6 VET’s natural policy connections – b) Science and technology 318  
        7 VET’s natural policy connections – c) Educational planning 318  
        8 VET’s natural connections – d) Enterprise development 319  
        9 VET, Education for All, and poverty reduction 319  
        10 Securing and monitoring VET in the post-2015 agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 321  
        11 In conclusion 321  
        References 322  
  Index of Authors 325  


nach oben


  Mehr zum Inhalt
Kapitelübersicht
Kurzinformation
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Leseprobe
Blick ins Buch
Fragen zu eBooks?

  Navigation
Belletristik / Romane
Computer
Geschichte
Kultur
Medizin / Gesundheit
Philosophie / Religion
Politik
Psychologie / Pädagogik
Ratgeber
Recht
Reise / Hobbys
Technik / Wissen
Wirtschaft

  Info
Hier gelangen Sie wieder zum Online-Auftritt Ihrer Bibliothek
© 2008-2020 ciando GmbH | Impressum | Kontakt | F.A.Q. | Datenschutz