Hilfe Warenkorb Konto Anmelden
 
 
   Schnellsuche   
     zur Expertensuche                      
Christian History - An Introduction
  Großes Bild
 
Christian History - An Introduction
von: Alister E. McGrath
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
ISBN: 9781118337820
394 Seiten, Download: 21055 KB
 
Format:  PDF
geeignet für: Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Online-Lesen PC, MAC, Laptop

Typ: A (einfacher Zugriff)

 

 
eBook anfordern
Inhaltsverzeichnis

  Cover 1  
  Title page 5  
  Copyright page 6  
  Brief Contents 7  
  Full Contents 9  
  Maps and Illustrations 15  
  How to Use This Book 17  
  1: The Early Church, 100–500 21  
     1.1. Setting the Context: The Origins of Christianity 22  
        1.1.1. The Crucible: The History of Israel 22  
        1.1.2. A Wider Context: The Pagan Quest for Wisdom 24  
        1.1.3. The Turning Point: Jesus of Nazareth 26  
        1.1.4. The Early Spread of Christianity 27  
        1.1.5. The Apostolic Age 30  
        1.1.6. Women in Apostolic Christianity 31  
        1.1.7. Christianity and Judaism: A Complex Relationship 34  
     1.2. Early Christianity and the Roman Empire 36  
        1.2.1. The Roman Empire, c. 100 37  
        1.2.2. Christianity and the Imperial Cult 39  
        1.2.3. Christianity and Judaism: Marcion of Sinope 40  
        1.2.4. Christianity and Pagan Culture: Justin Martyr 42  
        1.2.5. Early Christian Worship and Life 43  
     1.3. Early Christianity and the Hellenistic World 46  
        1.3.1. The Greek-Speaking World, c. 200 46  
        1.3.2. The Challenge of Gnosticism: Irenaeus of Lyons 48  
        1.3.3. The Challenge of Platonism: Clement of Alexandria and Origen 49  
        1.3.4. Christianity and the Cities: Alexandria and Antioch 51  
        1.3.5. Monasticism: A Reaction against the Cities 53  
        1.3.6. The Cult of Thecla: Women and the Churches 55  
     1.4. The Imperial Religion: The Conversion of Constantine 57  
        1.4.1. Roman Persecution of Christianity 58  
        1.4.2. The First Christian Emperor: Constantine 60  
        1.4.3. The Christianization of the Roman Empire 63  
        1.4.4. The Imperialization of Christianity 64  
        1.4.5. Augustine of Hippo: The Two Cities 66  
        1.4.6. The Decline of the Western Empire 68  
        1.4.7. The “New Rome”: Byzantium and the Eastern Empire 69  
     1.5. Orthodoxy and Heresy: Patterns in Early Christian Thought 72  
        1.5.1. The Boundaries of Faith: A Growing Issue 72  
        1.5.2. The Canon of the New Testament 74  
        1.5.3. Arianism: The Debate over the Identity of Jesus of Nazareth 75  
        1.5.4. Trinitarianism: A Debate about the Nature of God 78  
        1.5.5. Donatism: A Debate over the Nature of the Church 80  
        1.5.6. Pelagianism: A Debate over Grace and Human Achievement 81  
        1.5.7. Innovation: A Debate over the Role of Tradition 83  
        1.5.8. The Origins and Development of Creeds 84  
        1.5.9. The Council of Chalcedon, 451 86  
     Sources of Quotations 88  
     For Further Reading 88  
  2: The Middle Ages and Renaissance, c. 500–c. 1500 91  
     2.1. Setting the Context: The Background to the High Middle Ages 92  
        2.1.1. Western Christianity after the Fall of Rome 93  
        2.1.2. The Rise of Celtic Christianity 95  
        2.1.3. The Seventh Century: Islam and Arab Expansion 97  
        2.1.4. The Age of Charlemagne 98  
        2.1.5. The Rise of the Monastic and Cathedral Schools 100  
        2.1.6. Byzantine Christianity: Monophysitism and Iconoclasm 101  
        2.1.7. Ninth-Century Debates: The Real Presence and Predestination 102  
        2.1.8. Orthodox Missions to Eastern Europe: Bulgaria and Russia 103  
        2.1.9. The Tenth Century: Institutional Decline and Decay 105  
        2.1.10. The “Great Schism” between East and West (1054) 107  
     2.2. The Dawn of the High Middle Ages 108  
        2.2.1. The Eleventh Century: The Gregorian Reforms 109  
        2.2.2. The Cultural Renaissance of the Twelfth Century 111  
        2.2.3. The Codification of Theology and Canon Law 112  
        2.2.4. The Rise of the University: The Paris and Oxford Schools 114  
        2.2.5. The Crusades: Spain and the Middle East 116  
        2.2.6. Secular and Religious Power: Innocent III 118  
        2.2.7. Franciscans and Dominicans: The Rise of the Mendicant Orders 120  
        2.2.8. Women Mystics and Female Religious Orders 122  
     2.3. Medieval Religious Thought: The Scholastic Achievement 124  
        2.3.1. Cathedrals of the Mind: The Rise of Scholasticism 125  
        2.3.2. The Handmaid of Theology: The Rediscovery of Aristotle 127  
        2.3.3. A Reasonable Faith: Thomas Aquinas 128  
        2.3.4. Medieval Proofs for the Existence of God 129  
        2.3.5. The Consolidation of the Church’s Sacramental System 131  
        2.3.6. Medieval Biblical Interpretation 133  
        2.3.7. A Byzantine Critique of Scholasticism: Hesychasm 135  
        2.3.8. The Medieval Worldview: Dante’s Divine Comedy 136  
     2.4. The Later Middle Ages 138  
        2.4.1. The Avignon Papacy and the Great Schism 139  
        2.4.2. The Rise of Conciliarism 141  
        2.4.3. Eastern Europe: The Rise of Russia as a Christian Nation 143  
        2.4.4. Heresy: Waldensians, Hussites, and Wycliffites 145  
        2.4.5. The Modern Devotion: The Brethren of the Common Life 146  
        2.4.6. Popular Religion: The Cult of the Saints 148  
        2.4.7. The Rise of the Ottoman Empire: The Fall of Constantinople (1453) 151  
     2.5. The Renaissance: Cultural Renewal and Christian Expansion 152  
        2.5.1. A New Technology: The Religious Importance of Printing 153  
        2.5.2. The Origins of the Italian Renaissance 154  
        2.5.3. The Nature of Humanism 156  
        2.5.4. Erasmus of Rotterdam 158  
        2.5.5. The Renaissance and Religious Renewal 160  
        2.5.6. Christian Arts in the Middle Ages and Renaissance 163  
        2.5.7. Christian Expansion: Portuguese and Spanish Voyages of Discovery 165  
     Sources of Quotations 167  
     For Further Reading 168  
  3: Competing Visions of Reform, c. 1500–c. 1650 170  
     3.1. Setting the Context: The Background to the Reformation 171  
        3.1.1. The Pressure for Reform of the Church 171  
        3.1.2. The Changing Social Order of the Early Sixteenth Century 174  
        3.1.3. The Reformation and the Cities of Europe 175  
        3.1.4. A Crisis of Authority within the Church 176  
        3.1.5. The Origins of a Term: Protestantism 178  
     3.2. Protestantism: An Overview of a Movement 179  
        3.2.1. A Return to the Bible 179  
        3.2.2. The Doctrine of Justification by Faith 182  
        3.2.3. Democratization: The “Priesthood of All Believers” and the Use of the Vernacular 183  
        3.2.4. The Rejection of Papal Authority 185  
        3.2.5. Two Sacraments – and Reception in Both Kinds 188  
        3.2.6. A New Work Ethic and the Development of Capitalism 189  
     3.3. The Mainstream Reformation: Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin 190  
        3.3.1. Martin Luther: A Brief History 190  
        3.3.2. Luther’s Reformation at Wittenberg 193  
        3.3.3. Huldrych Zwingli: A Brief History 195  
        3.3.4. Zwingli’s Reformation at Zurich 197  
        3.3.5. John Calvin: A Brief History 199  
        3.3.6. Calvin’s Reformation at Geneva 201  
     3.4. Reformations across Europe: The Bigger Picture 203  
        3.4.1. The Radical Reformation 204  
        3.4.2. The English Reformation: Henry VIII 206  
        3.4.3. The English Reformation: Edward VI to Elizabeth I 209  
        3.4.4. The Catholic Reformation: The Life of the Church 211  
        3.4.5. The Catholic Reformation: The Thought of the Church 213  
        3.4.6. Women and the Reformation 215  
     3.5. The Post-Reformation Era 217  
        3.5.1. Confessionalism: The Second Reformation 217  
        3.5.2. Puritanism in England and North America 219  
        3.5.3. The King James Bible (1611) 221  
        3.5.4. Christianity and the Arts 223  
        3.5.5. Christianity and the Sciences 226  
        3.5.6. The Wars of Religion 229  
     Sources of Quotations 232  
     For Further Reading 232  
  4: The Modern Age, c. 1650–1914 234  
     4.1. The Age of Reason: The Enlightenment 235  
        4.1.1. The Rise of Indifference towards Religion 235  
        4.1.2. The Enlightenment and Christianity 237  
        4.1.3. Christian Beliefs in the “Age of Reason” 240  
        4.1.4. Pietism and Revival in Germany and England 242  
        4.1.5. America: The “Great Awakening” 244  
        4.1.6. The Suppression of the Jesuits, 1759–73 246  
        4.1.7. The American Revolution of 1776 248  
        4.1.8. The French Revolution of 1789 250  
        4.1.9. England: William Wilberforce and the Abolition of Slavery 252  
     4.2. An Age of Revolution: The Long Nineteenth Century in Europe 255  
        4.2.1. The Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna 255  
        4.2.2. Orthodox Resurgence: The Greek War of Independence 258  
        4.2.3. Atheism and an Ideology of Revolution: Feuerbach and Marx 259  
        4.2.4. Human Origins: Darwin’s Origin of Species (1859) 262  
        4.2.5. The Victorian Crisis of Faith 265  
        4.2.6. The Risorgimento: Italian Reunification and the Pope 266  
        4.2.7. The First Vatican Council: Papal Infallibility 268  
        4.2.8. German Culture Wars: Bismarck and Catholicism 270  
        4.2.9. Theological Revisionism: The Challenge of Modernism 272  
     4.3. The Long Nineteenth Century in America 274  
        4.3.1. Church and State: The Wall of Separation 275  
        4.3.2. The Second Great Awakening and American Revivalism 277  
        4.3.3. European Immigration and Religious Diversification 279  
        4.3.4. The Emergence of the “Bible Belt” 281  
        4.3.5. The Civil War: Slavery and Suffering 282  
        4.3.6. Pentecostalism: The American Origins of a Global Faith 285  
     4.4. An Age of Mission 287  
        4.4.1. The Origins of Protestant Missions 288  
        4.4.2. Missions and Colonialism: The Case of Anglicanism 290  
        4.4.3. Christian Missions to Asia 293  
        4.4.4. Christian Missions to Africa 296  
        4.4.5. Christian Missions to Native Americans 298  
        4.4.6. The Edinburgh World Missionary Conference, 1910 300  
     Sources of Quotations 303  
     For Further Reading 303  
  5: The Twentieth Century, 1914 to the Present 305  
     5.1. Setting the Context: Post-War Turbulence 305  
        5.1.1. The Armenian Genocide of 1915 307  
        5.1.2. The Russian Revolution of 1917 308  
        5.1.3. Post-War Disillusionment: The Theology of Crisis 310  
        5.1.4. America: The Fundamentalist Controversy 312  
        5.1.5. Mexico: The Cristero War 315  
        5.1.6. The Psychological Critique of Religion: Sigmund Freud 316  
        5.1.7. The German Church Crisis of the 1930s 319  
        5.1.8. The Spanish Civil War (1936–9) 322  
     5.2. Shifts in Western Christianity since the Second World War 323  
        5.2.1. The New World Order: Christianity and the Cold War 324  
        5.2.2. The World Council of Churches: The New Ecumenism 325  
        5.2.3. Billy Graham and the “New Evangelicalism” 328  
        5.2.4. The 1960s: The Origins of a Post-Christian Europe 330  
        5.2.5. The Second Vatican Council: Reform and Revitalization 332  
        5.2.6. Reconnecting with Culture: The Rise of Apologetics 335  
     5.3. The Sixties and Beyond: Western Christianity in an Age of Transition 338  
        5.3.1. Christianity and the American Civil Rights Movement 338  
        5.3.2. The Rise of the American “Religious Right” 339  
        5.3.3. The Erosion of Denominationalism in the United States 341  
        5.3.4. Faith Renewed: John Paul II and the Collapse of the Soviet Union 344  
        5.3.5. Challenging the Establishment: Feminism and Liberation Theology 346  
        5.3.6. Responding to Cultural Change: New Forms of Churches 349  
        5.3.7. The Equality Agenda: The Protestant Debate over Women’s Ordination 351  
     5.4. The Shift from the West: The New Christianity 354  
        5.4.1. The Middle East: The Decline of Arab Christianity 355  
        5.4.2. Korea: The Surprising Transformation of a Nation 356  
        5.4.3. China: The Resurgence of Christianity in the Middle Kingdom 358  
        5.4.4. The Rise of Post-Colonial Christianity: African Initiated Churches 360  
        5.4.5. The Rise of Pentecostalism in Latin America 362  
        5.4.6. Virtual Christianity: The Internet and New Patterns of Faith 364  
     For Further Reading 366  
  Where Next? 369  
  A Glossary of Christian Terms 371  
  Index 381  


nach oben


  Mehr zum Inhalt
Kapitelübersicht
Kurzinformation
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Leseprobe
Blick ins Buch
Fragen zu eBooks?

  Navigation
Belletristik / Romane
Computer
Geschichte
Kultur
Medizin / Gesundheit
Philosophie / Religion
Politik
Psychologie / Pädagogik
Ratgeber
Recht
Reise / Hobbys
Technik / Wissen
Wirtschaft

  Info
Hier gelangen Sie wieder zum Online-Auftritt Ihrer Bibliothek
© 2008-2020 ciando GmbH | Impressum | Kontakt | F.A.Q. | Datenschutz